Greybull KOA Local Attractions

Local Area Attractions Near Greybull KOA

There are lots of great reasons to stay a little longer at the Greybull KOA! There are local museums, fantastic sightseeing, the Big Horn Mountains, Shell Canyon and Waterfall - and if you just need a day to relax, the heated pool is wonderful!

Big Horn Mountains
Big Horn Mountains

From the peaks of the majestic Big Horn Mountains to the depths of breath-taking Bighorn Canyon, from the softly winding scenic by-ways through the Bighorn National Forest to the delicately trod upon wildlife trails in the foothills, Big Horn Mountain Country is an uncrowded year-round paradise enjoyed by the visitors and area residents alike. This four-county area encompasses 12,252 square miles of vast open spaces and rugged beauty. Lying in the center of this region are the spectacular Big Horn Mountains, so named after the great numbers of bighorn sheep found in the area.

Big Horn Canyon
Big Horn Canyon

Enjoy the breathtaking views of the Big Horn Canyon and the Devils Canyon overlook.

Dinosaur Tracksite
Dinosaur Tracksite

The Dinosaur track site's footprints are discovered in 1997. The,tracks,are believed to have been made during the Middle Jurassic Period, 160-180 million years ago, on what was then a shore of the,Sundance Sea. Theropod,tracks are thought to be among those discovered, but evidence suggests that the tracks were made by a large, diverse group of dinosaurs.The track site is in a limestone layer in the lower part of the Sundance Formation. It's discovery was somewhat surprising, since the Sundance was historically considered to be marine in nature. Indeed, the layer just above the,track site contains abundant marine fossils including numerous fossil shells indicating that later in the Jurassic it was once again submerged.

Medicine Wheel
Medicine Wheel

The Medicine Wheel is a sacred site, an historic site and an archeological site.It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1970. It was probably constructed between 1,200 and 1,700 A.D. An exact date has not been determined. It is approximately 245 feet in circumference with a central cairn, a small donut-shaped structure. From this central cairn, 28 spokes radiate to the outer rim of the circle. Placed at varying intervals around the rim are six smaller cairns.There are many legends and traditions which may explain the Wheel's origin. But there are no specific artifacts which determine exactly when or who constructed this unusual landmark.In this area of intense beauty, game is plentiful and the hills are filled with life. From the Wheel a magnificent view of distant, high peaks and the vastness of the Big Horn Basin can be seen below. There is solitude here, where the Medicine Wheel sits above timberline on Medicine Mountain.The site includes an interpretive sign and restroom facilities.The Medicine Wheel and Medicine Mountain reflect 10,000 years of Native American culture.

Shell Falls
Shell Falls

The water cascades 120 feet at the rate of some 3,600 gallons per second as it follows the breathtaking course of fractures in the three-billion-year-old granite.

Local Area Recreation Near Greybull KOA

Fishing

Fishing

Available fish in the Bighorn Mountains

Brook trout (Saivelinus Fontinalis) This small-headed fish gradually changes color from dark green on top to a white belly. The males have splashes of bright red on their bellies. The light spots on a dark background are joined by some red or pink spots with blue halos on the lower sides. Striking black-and-white borders are found on the lower fins and tail. This fish is mainly seen in waters at or above an elevation of 10,000 feet, though may be found at lower-elevations as well, they are usually the only fish found in the high mountain country. Brook trout are easy to catch. Fish for them with light or ultralight gear. The most frequently used bait is a piece of worm attached to a size 12 to 14 hook. The relative ease of catching, combined with the majestic mountain scenery where they live, makes brook-trout fishing an entertaining activity for families with young anglers. Brook trout spawn in the fall and fishing is good year-round.

Brown trout has olive hues on top, with yellow sides and a belly with black and red or maroon spots. The brown trout has a hard-to-catch reputation which makes the pursuit a challenge. There are many ways to attempt hooking, though if the "big ones" are your choice, the hours of twilight or darkness will offer the best chances. Live nightcrawlers are effective earlier in the season while using grasshoppers as bait in the late fall can provoke strikes that are almost violent. Anglers seeking to increase the challenge of fishing for brown trout prefer artificial flies and spinners. Brown trout prefer spawning in the fast water of streams in fall. This provides for some excellent fishing at a very colorful time of year.

Cutthroat trout is the only trout native to Wyoming. They have a heavier concentration of black spots in the tail area and there is a red or orange slash under the jaw. There are five subspecies of cutthroat trout in Wyoming and many more methods of catching them. Fly fishing seems to be the most popular, though not the only method. All of the subspecies of cutthroat spawn in the early spring. Depending on which of these subspecies is present, spawning may begin as early as March and continue into July.

Rainbow trout is native only to the rivers and lakes of North America, west of the Rocky Mountains and it is well-known as a hard-fighting game fish and tasty meal. Rainbow trout have coloring and patterns that vary widely depending on habitat, age, and spawning condition. They are torpedo-shaped and generally blue-green or yellow-green in color with a pink streak along their sides, white underbelly, and small black spots on their back and fins. They prefer cool, clear rivers, streams, and lakes. Rainbow trout survive on insects, crustaceans, and small fish.

Red Gulch Dinosaur Tracksite

Red Gulch Dinosaur Tracksite

The tracks are preserved in limestone in an area that was once a beach that fringed the Sundance Sea, a vast inland body of water. The individual footprints are aligned in dozens of trackways that can be traced for lengths of up to 12 meters across the bedrock surface. The tracks have been dated at 167 million years old and most range in length from 2 inches (4cm) to 10 inches (25 cm). The largest of these dinosaurs would probably have stood less than 7 feet (2.3 m) in height. Scientists do not know which dinosaur species made the tracks, since dinosaur fossils from this timeframe are so rare. Research continues in an effort to understand more about these fascinating trace fossils.

Golf

Golf

Midway Golf Course in Basin, just 7 miles from Greybull. 
Check the website for current rates: http://www.midwaygolfcourse.com

Mountain Attractions

Mountain Attractions

Take a daytrip (total trip length 160 miles) from Greybull KOA going west along Highway 14. After leaving Greybull, pass the airport, and take a right turn on the 310 towards Lovell.
Before entering Lovell, turn right onto 14A, towards Burgess Junction. But first, visit the Bighorn Canyon Visitors Center, on your right side, right after the turn, and get all the information about the Big Horn Recreation Area.
Back on the 14A make a left turn on the 37. See the wild horses at the Pryor Mountain wild horse range, and enjoy the breathtaking views of the Devils Canyon overlook. Follow the road over Bad Pass trail, and visit the historic ranch, once owned by Caroline Lockhart, a novelist, who became a “cattle queen”. Return to the 14a, and follow it going east. You will come upon the Bighorn Medicine Wheel, a mysterious, native American religious site. It's about a one and a half mile walk, but it's worth it.
Follow the 14a again and continue on to Burgess Junction, have lunch at the Bear Lodge Resort then turn right onto Highway 14 towards Greybull.
Drive over Granite Pass, and look for many species of wildlife that make the scenic Bighorn Mountains their home.
Follow through Shell Canyon, and stop at the Shell Falls interpretive site where you'll see the picturesque Shell Falls as it flows 3,600 gallons of water per second. You'll be able to learn about the ancient fossil shells that give the canyon and falls their name.
Follow the road through Shell to Greybull.
After such a beautiful day it's nice to be back at the Greybull KOA and relax at our refreshing pool.

Hiking

Hiking

There are many hiking trails throughout the Big Horn Mountains and Bighorn National Forest, providing the hiker/backpacker with scenic views of mountain vistas, lakes, and wildlife.
Hikers may see deer, moose and elk as well as numerous small species of animals and birds. Care should be exercised when viewing unpredictable animals such as moose.
There are also over 200 lakes in the Big Horn Mountains, including Willow Lake and Romeo Lake. Lakes and some other areas are often rocky, so hikers are advised to use care when walking.
Mountain lakes also provide excellent trout fishing. Both resident and non-resident fishing licenses can be obtained from local stores before beginning your hike.
Scenery is spectacular, so be sure to bring a camera. Binoculars are also handy for viewing wildlife and scenery at a distance.
Most trails are well marked and it is advisable to remain on the trails.
Trail, topographic and National Forest maps are available at the Greybull KOA and through the National Forest Service.
If you intend to hike into the Cloud Peak Wilderness Area, you are required to register at the trailhead before you begin your hike. Manual registration boxes are provided at trailhead locations. Registration assists Forest Service and emergency officials in locating lost or injured persons.
Hikers and backpackers should also obey all Forest Service fire restrictions and regulations when hiking in the National Forest. There are particular regulations regarding the use of motorized vehicles and campfires in the Bighorn National Forest and Cloud Peak Wilderness area.
Additional information on hiking and backpacking in the Bighorn Mountains and Bighorn National Forest can be obtained by contacting the National Forest Offices.

Oh My, There's Nothing Here!

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