Cartersville / Cassville-White KOA

Jay and Ann Camp, Managers..We would like to thank all the campers that have visited us in the past 2 1/2yrs, allowing us to provide a pleasant, quiet and enjoyable stay at Cartersville KOA. We appreciate your business.

Whether you're seeking the quiet of a country campground or the "Hot-Lanta" attractions of one of America's most vivacious cities, this KOA has you covered. The campground off ers quick-and-easy access from I-75, large Pull-Thru RV Sites and two huge pet-walk areas to help the whole family unwind from a road trip. With the red-rock rolling hills of northern Georgia surrounding you, you're a mere 45 to 50 freeway miles from Atlanta. Get out and explore the Etowah Indian Mounds Historic Site, the 1880s covered bridge and Pickett's Mill Battlefield Historic Site. Or take a stroll through the Booth Western Art Museum. It's just a one-hour drive to Six Flags Over Georgia and Stone Mountain Park. Sample the historic charm of nearby Rome and Cartersville. Stop by the Weinman Mineral Gallery at Tellus Science Museum (I-75, Exit 293), only 3 miles from the campground. Pool: Memorial Weekend - Labor Day Weekend. Max pull thru: 100 feet. Your hosts: Jay and Ann Camp.

Accent Photo

Campground Amenities

  • 50 Max Amp
  • 75' Max Length
  • Wi-Fi
  • Cable TV
  • (5/25 - 9/7)
  • Propane ($)
  • Firewood ($)
  • Pavilion
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Ways to Stay

KOA Journey

KOA Journey Campgrounds

KOA Journey campgrounds are the perfect oases after a day on the road. Whether it’s along the way or a quick getaway, they’ve got you covered. Located near the highways and byways of North America with long Pull-thru RV Sites, they deliver convenience to the traveling camper. Pull in, ease back and take a load off.

KOA Journeys Feature:

  • Pull-through RV Sites with 50-amp service
  • Premium Tent Sites
  • Well lit after hours check-in service

KOA Blog: Latest Stories

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Local Area

Tellus Northwest Georgia Science Museum

Located just 3 miles from our campground! See sparkling gems and minerals, more than 40 pre-historic animals, a steam-powered locomotive, a helicopter and a jet cockpit, or travel the galaxy with a show in the planetarium and see the stars in a new light with special stargazing events at the observatory. Tellus is open Monday-Sunday 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.

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Cartersville, Georgia

Visit the Grand Theater, a National Register Property, which was built in 1928 and still stages theatrical and operatic performances.

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New Echota

In 1825, the Cherokee National Legislature established a capital called New Echota. The thriving town, this new governmental seat became headquarters for the small independent eastern Tennessee and northeastern Alabama. Today, New Echota is an active State Historic Site where visitors can tour original and reconstructed historic structures and learn about the dreams and lives of the Indians who tried to pattern their government and lifestyle after the white man only to be uprooted from their land removed westward on the Trail of Tears in 1838-39.

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Etowah Indian Mounds State Historic Site

Home to several thousand Native Americans from 1000 A.D. to 1550 A.D., this 54 acre site contains six earthen mounds, a plaza, and village area, borrow pits and defensive ditch. This is the most intact Mississippian Culture site in the Southeastern United States. The Etowah Indian Mounds symbolize a society rich in ritual. Towering over the community, the 63-foot flat-topped earthen knoll was used as a platform for the home of the priest-chief. In another mound, nobility were buried in elaborate costumes accompanied by items they would need in their after-lives. Today, visitors may tour the museum where exhibits interpret daily life in the once self-sufficient community.

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Campground Awards and Programs